Category Archives: Promoting OR

Bringing Research into the Classroom: Can Relevant and Impactful be Easy to Explain?

math-equation_chalkboard O.R. researchers and practitioners are constantly churning out papers that tackle a wide variety of important and hard-to-solve practical problems. On one hand, as a researcher, I understand how difficult these problems can be and how it’s often the case that fancy math and complex algorithms need to be used. On the other hand, as someone who teaches optimization to MBA students who aren’t easily excited by mathematics, I’m always looking for motivational examples that are both interesting and not too complex to be understood in 5 minutes. (That’s the little slot of time I reserve at the beginning of my lectures to go over an application before the lecture itself starts.)

Every now and then, I come across a paper that fits the bill perfectly: it addresses an important problem, produces impactful results, and (here comes the rare part), accomplishes the previous two goals by using math that my MBA students can follow 100%, while being confident that they themselves could replicate it given what they learned in my course (the optimization models).

The paper to which I’m referring has recently appeared in Operations Research (Articles in Advance, January 2017): The Impact of Linear Optimization on Promotion Planning, by Maxime C. Cohen, Ngai-Hang Zachary Leung, Kiran Panchamgam, Georgia Perakis, and Anthony Smith (http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/opre.2016.1573).

If I had to pick one word to describe this paper, it would be BEAUTIFUL.

I immediately proceeded to put together a 5-minute summary presentation (8 slides) to cover the problem, approach, and results. I’ll be showing this to 100 of my MBA students on this coming Tuesday (Valentine’s Day!). I hope they love it as much as I did. Feel free to show this presentation to your own students if you wish, and let me know how it went down in the comments.

A recent Poets & Quants article explains how business schools with the highest quality teaching strive to bring their faculty’s research into the classroom so that students get to learn the latest and greatest ideas. The O.R. paper above is a perfect example of when this can be done effectively.

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Filed under Analytics, Applications, Integer Programming, Linear Programming, Modeling, Motivation, Promoting OR, Research, Teaching

The First Sentence of the Great Analytics Novel

Thedarktower7 I’ve written many times before about the importance of promoting O.R. to the general public. One of the ideas that’s been suggested by several people is the possibility of writing a work of fiction whose main character (our hero) is an O.R./Analytics person. I still believe this is a great idea, if executed properly.

Today, my wife brought to my attention The Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest, which, according to their web page, consists of the following:

Since 1982 the English Department at San Jose State University has sponsored the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest, a whimsical literary competition that challenges entrants to compose the opening sentence to the worst of all possible novels. The contest (hereafter referred to as the BLFC) was the brainchild (or Rosemary’s baby) of Professor Scott Rice, whose graduate school excavations unearthed the source of the line “It was a dark and stormy night.” Sentenced to write a seminar paper on a minor Victorian novelist, he chose the man with the funny hyphenated name, Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, who was best known for perpetrating The Last Days of PompeiiEugene AramRienziThe CaxtonsThe Coming Race, and – not least – Paul Clifford, whose famous opener has been plagiarized repeatedly by the cartoon beagle Snoopy. No less impressively, Lytton coined phrases that have become common parlance in our language: “the pen is mightier than the sword,” “the great unwashed,” and “the almighty dollar” (the latter from The Coming Race, now available from Broadview Press).

Just like an awful first sentence can be a good indicator of a terrible book, the converse can also be true. Take, for example, the first sentence of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower series, which I happen to be reading (and loving) as we speak:

The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.

It’s such a strong, mysterious, and captivating sentence…

…which brings me to the point of this post. If it’s going to be difficult to write The Great Analytics Novel, what if we start by thinking about what would be the perfect, most compelling sentence to start such a novel? Yes, I propose a contest. Let’s use our artistic abilities and suggest starting sentences. Feel free to add them as comments to this post. Who knows? Maybe someone will get inspired and start writing the novel.

Here’s mine:

Upon using the word “mathematical” he knew he had lost the battle for, despite the dramatic cost savings, their logical reasoning was instantly halted, like a snowshoe hare frozen in fear of its chief predator: the Canada lynx.

I can’t wait to read your submissions!

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Filed under Analytics, Books, Challenge, INFORMS Public Information Committee, Motivation, Promoting OR

Promote O.R. by Taking Folks by Surprise

Due to a number of things that have been keeping me busy, including a 20-day fight against a kidney stone that is now finally over, I haven’t had much time to post. I have two ideas that I plan to turn into posts soon, but in the meantime I’d like to suggest that everyone write a post about “santa claus” and “reindeer” (and properly tag it with those words). As the picture below indicates, I’ve been getting a lot of hits lately (way above average) and, digging deeper, I see that my post entitled “How Should Santa Pair Up His Reindeer?” has had 2,209 views this past week. Yay for Christmas!

Screen Shot 2012-12-04 at 10.27.15 AMAs a matter of fact, I suggest that everyone write a post about each special date of the year (Easter, Fourth of July, Valentine’s Day, Summer Camp, etc.). Those will keep bringing you recurring visits, without any extra effort, year after year. Of course not all (in fact, most) of those visits will be here for O.R. But that’s the point! If we want to spread the word about O.R. we’ve got to take people by surprise. “I was just looking for a cute reindeer picture and this guy blew my mind by showing me that math and reindeer have something to do with each other! How cool is that!”

BTW, I just realized I do not have an Easter post. I need to take care of this…

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Filed under Holidays, Promoting OR

Did You See Any OR During Apple’s iPhone 5 Announcement? I did!

On September 12, Apple finally announced its much-awaited iPhone 5. I didn’t have time to watch the keynote speech, but I watched the shorter 7-minute video that’s posted on Apple’s web site featuring Jony Ive, Apple’s Senior Vice President, Design. In that video, at around the 5-minute, 26-second mark, something they said caught my attention: the way they put parts together during the assembly process. I encourage you to watch that part of the video before reading on.

Jony Ive says:

Never before, have we built a product with this extraordinary level of fit and finish. We’ve developed manufacturing processes that are our most complex and ambitious.

And on Apple’s web site, they say this:

During manufacturing, each iPhone 5 aluminum housing is photographed by two high-powered 29MP cameras. A machine then examines the images and compares them against 725 unique inlays to find the most precise match for every single iPhone.

So let’s see if I understood this correctly. In a typical manufacturing operation, the multiple parts that get put together to create a product are put together without much fuss. A machine makes part A, another machine makes part B, and perhaps a robotic arm or a third machine takes any one of the many part A’s that are coming down a conveyor belt and attaches it to any one of the many part B’s that are coming down another conveyor belt. What Apple did was to improve on the “any one” choice. I don’t know if Apple pioneered this idea, I’d say probably not, but this is the first time I hear about something like this. If you’ve seen this before, let me know in the comments.

Before OR comes into play, Computer Science does its job in the form of computer vision / image processing algorithms. The photographs of the parts are analyzed and (I’m guessing) a fitness score is calculated for every possible matching pair of parts A (the housing) and B (the inlay). What happens next? How do they pick the winning match? Here are some possibilities:

  1. Each part A is matched with the part B, among the 725 candidates, that produces the best matching score.
  2. A 725 by 725 matrix of fitness scores is created between 725 parts of type A and 725 parts of type B, and the best 725 matches are chosen so as to maximize the overall fitness score (i.e. the sum of the fitness scores of all the chosen matches).
  3. Proceed as in the previous case, but pick the 725 matches that maximize the minimum fitness score. That is, we worry about the worst case and don’t let the worst match be too bad when compared to the best match.

After these 725 pairs are put together, new sets of parts A and B come down the conveyor belt and the matching process is repeated. Possibility number 1 is the fastest (e.g. do a binary search, or build a priority queue), but not necessarily the best because every now and then a bad match will have to be made. Possibilities 2 (an assignment problem) and 3 (assignment problem with a max-min objective) are better, in my opinion, with the third one being my favorite. They are, however, more time consuming than possibility 1. Jony Ive says the choice is made “instantaneously”, which doesn’t preclude something fancier than possibility 1 from being used given the assignment problems are pretty small.

The result? In the words of Jony Ive:

The variances from product to product, we now measure in microns.

It is well-known that OR plays a very important role in manufacturing (facility layout, machine/job scheduling, etc.) but it’s not every day that people stop to think about what happens in a manufacturing plant. This highly-popular announcement being watched by so many people around the world painted a very clear picture of the kinds of problems high-tech manufacturing facilities face. I think it’s a great example of what OR can do, and how relevant it is to our companies and our lives.

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Filed under Applications, iPhone, Motivation, Promoting OR

Fourth of July Logistics in Coral Gables: No OR, No Glory

After a six-year hiatus, the city of Coral Gables and the Biltmore Hotel decided to host the Fourth of July celebrations once again including, of course, a very nice fireworks display on the Biltmore 18-hole golf course. My wife and I had watched the Independence Day fireworks at Biscayne bay and on the beach the past two years, so we thought this would be a nice change.

At the outset, the event seemed to be very well organized with buses and trolleys departing from four different places in the city to take people to the hotel, as shown in the map below.

So we parked our car at the Andalusia garage (Garage 4 on the map) and took the 6pm trolley. There was going to be a concert starting at 7pm, while the fireworks would go off at 9pm. We found a nice spot to place our chairs and my wife’s camera tripod, so we sat down and relaxed. Numerous food trucks offered plenty of tasty choices, the concert was entertaining and, most importantly, we loved the fireworks. All in all, we were very pleased with the whole thing. The problems started once the fireworks ended. Take a look at this map.

The red arrows indicate the flow of people trying to exit the golf course through a single narrow path (people coming from all directions were converging to that point). The yellow arrows start at the trolley/bus stop (a single stop) and show the path the trolleys/buses would take to go back to the garages in the previous map.

By now you’ve already guessed what happened, but I’ll list some of the main problems: (1) large congestion to exit the golf course (bottleneck); (2) no organized lines were formed by the police; people simply aggregated as a large mass at the bus stop (forget about FIFO); (3) tons of people actually drove their cars and parked not only in the parking lot depicted above, but also all around the neighborhood surrounding the hotel. Therefore, the yellow bus path was full of pedestrians walking to their cars (or walking home) and the police did not allow trolleys/buses to come in or out while there were pedestrians on the road (that is, forever); (4) we were given no indication as to which would be the destination of the incoming trolley/bus until they were parked at the stop (crowd left in the dark = annoyed crowd).

After standing there for a while, my wife and I decided that it would be much faster and less stressful if we simply walked back to Garage 4 (a 1.3-mile, 25-minute walk). Yes, it was very hot that day, and we had to carry some heavy chairs and equipment, but it was better than suffering through the chaos.

As an Operations Research person, I couldn’t stop thinking of all the bad decisions that were made by the organization of this event. I know they meant well, but everyone’s experience would have been much more enjoyable if they did a few things differently. Some of my suggestions below require conveying information to the attendees ahead of time, but this could have been accomplished by handing out flyers to people as they arrived. (Arrivals were not a problem because they were spread out over 3.5 hours, between 5 and 8:30pm.)

  • Divide the crowd by telling people to exit the golf course through different paths depending on where they’re headed: those walking home exit through gate A, those walking to the Biltmore parking lot exit through gate B, those wishing to catch a trolley/bus, exit through gate C, etc.
  • Have multiple bus stops, reasonably away from each other.
  • Have barricades set up so that: (1) lines are properly formed at the bus stops, (2) pedestrians do not walk on the road and impede the flow of trolleys/buses.
  • Schedule the return trips of trolleys/buses in advance and tell people to come to the bus stop at their assigned time based on desired destination (à la Disney fast pass).

These are just some ideas that came to mind right away, but I bet more improvements are possible (what would you have done, dear reader?). Judging by how many of my friends who did not attend the event already knew it had had a chaotic ending even before I told them, I’m sure the city received plenty of feedback. I expect next year’s event to run much more smoothly. However, just in case they need a little extra help, I’d like to write a quick letter to the City of Coral Gables:

Dear City of Coral Gables:

I’m a professor at the University of Miami who specializes in using advanced analytical methods to help with decision making. If you need help with the logistics of your Fourth of July Fireworks or any other city-sponsored activity, I’m available. Here’s my contact information.

Sincerely,

Tallys Yunes.

To end this post on a happy note, here are some beautiful photos of the fireworks taken by my favorite photographer. Enjoy!

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Filed under Applications, Holidays, Promoting OR

The “Real” Reason Bill Cook Created the TSP App

By now, most people are aware of the latest Internet meme Texts from Hillary which is, by the way, hilarious. You’re also probably aware that Bill Cook created an iPhone App that allows one to solve traveling salesman problems (TSP) on a mobile phone! If you like optimization, you have to give this App a try; and make sure to check out the Traveling Salesman book too!

Inspired by Texts from Hillary I finally figured out the “real” reason why Bill Cook created the App. Here it is:

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Filed under Applications, Books, iPhone, Meme, People, Promoting OR, Traveling Salesman Problem

Operations Research Memes

In the spirit of bringing awareness about O.R. to the masses, I created the memes below. Perhaps they’ll gain some traction or at least get a few people to wonder about what O.R. is. Who knows, they may even motivate someone to Google the term! If you end up making your own O.R.-inspired meme, please send me a link to it via the comments section. To create mine, I used the quickmeme.com web site.

UPDATE: A few other OR bloggers and tweeps joined the meme crusade! Here are their creations (in chronological order of my becoming aware of them):

Laura McLay created the memes below:

Michael Trick created these:

Paul Rubin suggested the creation of this one:

Guido Diepen created this one:

Bill Cook made this cool TSP meme:

Paul Rubin made this one, western style:

My MBA student William Bucciero got inspired by these O.R. memes and made some of his own. He was kind enough to share them with me. I think he did a great job! Here they are:

Another one of my MBA students, Jason Siem, also joined the O.R. meme bandwagon. Here’s one of his (pretty funny and true):

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Filed under Meme, Promoting OR