MLB Umpire Scheduling

There are two purposes to this post. First, I’d like to follow-up on Michael Trick’s post on the importance of teaching and its relationship with research. One of the points Mike makes is that your next exciting research or consulting project may come from current or former students. Those of us who teach undergraduate and MBA classes have the opportunity to network with (future) managers and practitioners who will eventually put their training to the test, producing actual answers to real-life problems. And if one of those problems requires more OR knowledge than what they had the opportunity to learn in school, they might remember their friendly neighborhood OR professor. Another way research can come out of teaching is during hands-on projects. Back in 2006, Mike was in charge of an elective OR-project class that allows MBA students to try their hands on a real-life problem; in that case umpire scheduling. To my delight, Mike invited me to be the TA for that course and I gladly accepted. The rest is history.

The second purpose of this post is to help myself keep track of the recent news stories about our umpire scheduling paper. Thanks to an excellent job by the PR departments at the University of Miami School of Business (thanks, Catharine!) and Michigan State University, the story has appeared in numerous outlets. As a matter of fact, I’m very excited to report that Scientific American had a 60-second science podcast about our work:

August 18Scientific American: Researchers Tell Umpires Where to Go (PDF version)

Here are a few other news outlets that covered the story (I’m trying to keep this list up-to-date for my own sake). I’m also providing a link to a PDF version of each story in case the web pages are taken offline:

April 2012, The Spring issue of Business Miami Magazine has an article about our work entitled Road Trip (PDF version).

October 19, WAMC Northeast Public Radio Academic Minute. I recorded a 1:45-minute explanation of the problem, approach, and results which aired as one of WAMC’s Academic Minutes on the same day of the first game of the World Series. That was a lot of fun! Click on the link to listen. If the link doesn’t work, here’s the MP3 file.

September 6, Miami New Times: Tallys Yunes, UM Professor, Solves MLB’s Umpire Scheduling Dilemma (PDF version). This article also appeared in print, in the September 8-14 issue of Miami New Times. Here’s a PDF scan of that.

August 3, PhysOrg: University of Miami Business Professor Helps Create a Successful Scheduling Method for Umpires in Major League Baseball (PDF version)

August 3, HPCwire: Business Prof Solves Traveling Umpire Problem for Major League Baseball (PDF version)

July 31, University of Miami School of Business: School’s Management Science Research Resolves Major League Baseball’s Umpire Scheduling Challenges (PDF version)

July 21, ScienceDaily: Scholar Helps Make Major League Baseball Umpire Schedule a Hit (PDF version)

July 21, ThePostGame: MLB Umpires Have a Turkish Secret Weapon (PDF version)

July 20, PhysOrg: Michigan State Scholar Helps Make MLB Umpire Schedule a Hit (PDF version)

July 20, Michigan State University News: Michigan State Scholar Helps Make MLB Umpire Schedule a Hit (PDF version)

I greatly enjoy the teaching side of my job because I believe it complements the research side quite well. I’m looking forward to bringing articles like the ones above to my classes in the Spring and I’m sure they’ll be well received.

Further acknowledgments: thanks to those who also helped spread the word about the umpire scheduling problem on Twitter, especially Paul Rubin (@parubin), Aurélie Thiele (@aureliethiele), and @INFORMS (is that you, Mary Leszczynski? :-).

3 Comments

Filed under Applications, Heuristics, Promoting OR, Research, Sports, Teaching, Traveling Umpire Problem

3 responses to “MLB Umpire Scheduling

  1. Dr. Eric Woychik

    I do not have a dog in this hunt, but the first game between TX and Detroit suggests the home plate umpire is acting prejudicial. I am former FIFA competitive ref. No one wants the ref to decide the game. Looks obviously biased at this point, and it is just top of the 4th. Why watch baseball or go to games if it is determined by refs? Pretty unhappy about such behavior. Eric Woychik, Oakland, CA. PS big fan of Ron Washington (close friend of the A’s and Dave Stewart), but want him to win legitimately, not because of the ref

  2. Pingback: Michael Trick’s Operations Research Blog : Benchmarks: Coloring, Sports and Umpires

  3. Pingback: Improving Traveling Umpire Solutions the Miami Heat Way: Not one, not two, not three… | O.R. by the Beach

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